GALLERY

Yosuke Harada

“ World-Becoming Things ”

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2012Grand Prize

ARTIST STATEMENT

World-Becoming Things

This work was put together with the title “World-Becoming Things.” Rather than shooting with the theme of “World-Becoming Things” it is through the act of taking photos, people and things, landscapes, phenomenon, and events, which are subjects appearing as “World-Becoming Things,” that a special place forms separate from the everyday world.
I went to an art university and drew pictures, but when it comes to viewing photos and viewing pictures, there is a big difference from the viewpoint of the creator. The act of looking at a picture is to condense the visual sense and send as if with a beam, focusing the consciousness on viewing. As work accumulates, something within you that appears as a lump is what is sought. On the other hand, the act of looking at a photo is for the visual sense to penetrate the spot, scatter, and become lost in it. What is portrayed in a photo is what is there, and has nothing to do with my intentions, it is just something that is conveyed through me and becomes visible to the outside world.
I have a feeling that what comes from within me is not really getting through. As I am merely a mediator of seeing, I must commit myself to the fullest, and I have a strong sense that I was just able to be present. Slipping away from reality, this means that the idea of viewing is indecisive. Looking for this, I am wait until I melt away into the air, and my senses have adapted. Now, rather than wanting to capture absolute moments, in the fairly long term after detaching from the time axis, the side that is viewing, and the side being viewed begin to conflict with each other. While measuring a distance, something like a middle place occurs in which I join with the subject, where consciousness comes and goes. My sense of sight withdraws behind my eyes, and it seems as though I am looking from behind my head. There is something there, and what is not below or above is in front, and my consciousness directed at the subject becomes distanced without even noticing, and I look out with a sense of nothingness. If you can look at the works for as long as you like, and if the person looking becomes unconscious of looking, and can get lost in it, I think that is great. As I basically have a difficult-to-please personality, I question many things that I see, and everything is a challenge. Every day, we are inundated with intolerable lightness and looseness which comes along with newness. Resigning my body to instantaneous joy that is renewed sporadically, becoming numb and temporarily putting the senses on hold, I want to experience the act of seeing with my own eyes. Through the act of photographing, being fascinated by nothing, just looking, and while thinking about nothing, doubting everything is contradictory, but even so, in the end I want to be positive about the world and myself as is. Photos and artwork are consumed and not envisioned as things, and I wonder how society deals with them. What are photos, what is art, what is artwork, what is creating, and what is seeing? If we are to use the word understand, in truth I don’t understand anything. The more I think about it, the more I want to understand, but am no longer able to understand, and I believe I can only continue to be involved. I can no longer escape from seeing, and I also can’t escape from the longing to see. I want to have an even better eye, so I will be able to appreciate a variety of sights.

Entries form: File, 11x14, color prints, 58 pieces

Selecting judge: Minoru Shimizu

He received the Excellence Award for being exceptionally orthodox when it comes to photography. The title “Die Welt weltet” is a saying from Heidegger I believe, with the concept of expressing the instant the world is excited in photographs. Rather than the world simply existing statically, existing is some kind of verbal event. That instant is, for example, when you look at something through a crack and are able to emphasize the existence of something that you could not see is the moment when everyday changes to a verbal state. Furthermore, he is a man with a presence, and his portraits of women taken from the front are incorporated as separators, and they leave a strong impression as a photo book. By leaving behind the usual worldly meanings, and establishing images from the phenomenon known as worlding, I feel that he has successfully achieved the basic form that photos should have. He takes a good look at the subject, and with power well established as photos, rather than a flash of new talent, and even though he does not have flair, I feel that he has potential. Being orthodox is really quite rare.

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PROFILE

Yosuke Harada

1982 Born in Saga prefecture
2007 Graduated from Tama Art University, Department of Graphic Design, Faculty of Art and Design
2012 Received an Excellence Award at the 35th New Cosmos of Photography (selected by Minoru Shimizu) and won the Grand Prize at the New Cosmos of Photography 2012 Exhibition
(At the time of 2012)
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2012Grand Prize

Yosuke Harada

World-Becoming Things

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