Canon

TSUZURI Movie

  • 05'00"

    Tsuzuri Project: Highlights

    In 2007, Canon and the Kyoto Culture Association (NPO) jointly launched the Tsuzuri Project with the aim of preserving and sharing important Japanese cultural assets such as decorative folding screens and sliding door paintings through the creation of high-resolution facsimiles. This video highlights the various works that have been reproduced to date and presents the production process used to make the facsimiles.
     
    Created: May 2014

  • 04'02"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    The Passion of the Festival Transcends Time: “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” Makes a Symbolic Return Home

    A documentary movie of the Tsuzuri Project work “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine,” the original of which is in the collection of the British Museum. The large screens that survive today were painted 350 years ago, and depict scenes from the Owari Tsushima Tenno Festival. With the help of the British Museum, Canon began efforts to bring the work back to Tsushima City and Aisai City (Aichi Prefecture), where the festival is held, as a high-resolution facsimile.
     
    Created: July 2018

  • 04'29"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    Once Again, to Tonomine: “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” Makes a Symbolic Return Home

    A documentary movie of the Tsuzuri Project work “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter,” the original of which is in the collection of the British Museum. Believed to date back to the beginning of the 17th century, it comprises four sliding-door panels painted in a composition and style typical of the Kano school. With the help of the British Museum, Canon began efforts to bring the work back to its original home in Tanzan Shrine (Nara Prefecture) as a high-resolution facsimile.
     
    Created: July 2018

  • 06'40"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    Restoring the Beauty of a Dynasty Past: Folding screen by Tosa Mitsuyoshi depicting a scene from the historical novel, The Tale of Genji

    Canon used its most advanced input and output technologies to create a high-definition reproduction of the paintings on a folding screen that depict scenes from The Tale of Genji, the renowned historical novel. A reproduction of this screen — the original of which is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — has been donated to the Byodoin Temple in Uji, Japan.
     
    Created: March 2016

  • 06'51"

    The Tsuzuri Project:From Beyond the Sea and Clouds "Dragon and Clouds by Soga Shohaku"

    A documentary movie of Tsuzuri Project Work "Dragon and Clouds." The original now resides overseas in the United States, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
     
    Created: April 2015

  • 06'48"

    Tsuzuri Project: A Brush with History

    The goal of the Tsuzuri Project is not to complete high-definition reproductions. Its real purpose is to touch our hearts.We produced a video showing how the recipients of these reproductions use them in the temples of Kyoto, in new museum workshops, and for teaching at elementary schools.
     
    Created: June 2014

  • 06'58"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    Sliding Door Paintings of Shoshinden of Daikakuji Temple Recreated On-site after an Absence of 250 Years

    Sliding door paintings by Kano Sanraku are believed to have been installed in the Take-no-ma (bamboo room) of Shoshinden of Daikakuji Temple in Kyoto until 250 years ago. The paintings, which depict four seasonal views of rice cultivation, are now in the possession of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in the U.S.A. We observed the preparation of high-resolution facsimiles that will be restored at the original installation site.
     
    Created: May 2014

  • 05'09"

    Tsuzuri Project: Kenninji Temple Restoration - 50 painted Panels

    Long ago, Kenninji Temple in Kyoto was home to 50 panels painted by artist Kaiho Yusho. Since 1934, however, when Kenninji Temple suffered damage during the Muroto Typhoon, the panels, converted into hanging scrolls, have been entrusted to the Kyoto National Museum. The Tsuzuri Project produced high-resolution facsimiles of these works as sliding doors so they could be installed in the temple, their original home, and viewed as they once had been displayed. After five years of work, the restoration of the 50 Kenninji Temple panels was completed in November 2012.
     
    Created: February 2013

  • 04'57"

    Tsuzuri Project: Highlights

    In 2007, Canon and the Kyoto Culture Association (NPO) jointly launched the Tsuzuri Project with the aim of preserving and sharing important Japanese cultural assets such as decorative folding screens and sliding door paintings through the creation of high-resolution facsimiles. This video highlights the various works that have been reproduced to date and presents the production process used to make the facsimiles.
     
    Created: May 2014

  • 04'02"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    The Passion of the Festival Transcends Time: “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” Makes a Symbolic Return Home

    A documentary movie of the Tsuzuri Project work “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine,” the original of which is in the collection of the British Museum. The large screens that survive today were painted 350 years ago, and depict scenes from the Owari Tsushima Tenno Festival. With the help of the British Museum, Canon began efforts to bring the work back to Tsushima City and Aisai City (Aichi Prefecture), where the festival is held, as a high-resolution facsimile.
     
    Created: July 2018

  • 04'29"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    Once Again, to Tonomine: “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” Makes a Symbolic Return Home

    A documentary movie of the Tsuzuri Project work “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter,” the original of which is in the collection of the British Museum. Believed to date back to the beginning of the 17th century, it comprises four sliding-door panels painted in a composition and style typical of the Kano school. With the help of the British Museum, Canon began efforts to bring the work back to its original home in Tanzan Shrine (Nara Prefecture) as a high-resolution facsimile.
     
    Created: July 2018

  • 06'47"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    Restoring the Beauty of a Dynasty Past: Folding screen by Tosa Mitsuyoshi depicting a scene from the historical novel, The Tale of Genji

    Canon used its most advanced input and output technologies to create a high-definition reproduction of the paintings on a folding screen that depict scenes from The Tale of Genji, the renowned historical novel. A reproduction of this screen — the original of which is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — has been donated to the Byodoin Temple in Uji, Japan.
     
    Created: March 2016

  • 06'51"

    The Tsuzuri Project:From Beyond the Sea and Clouds "Dragon and Clouds by Soga Shohaku"

    A documentary movie of Tsuzuri Project Work "Dragon and Clouds." The original now resides overseas in the United States, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
     
    Created: April 2015

  • 06'48"

    Tsuzuri Project: A Brush with History

    The goal of the Tsuzuri Project is not to complete high-definition reproductions. Its real purpose is to touch our hearts.We produced a video showing how the recipients of these reproductions use them in the temples of Kyoto, in new museum workshops, and for teaching at elementary schools.
     
    Created: June 2014

  • 06'57"

    The Tsuzuri Project:
    Sliding Door Paintings of Shoshinden of Daikakuji Temple Recreated On-site after an Absence of 250 Years

    Sliding door paintings by Kano Sanraku are believed to have been installed in the Take-no-ma (bamboo room) of Shoshinden of Daikakuji Temple in Kyoto until 250 years ago. The paintings, which depict four seasonal views of rice cultivation, are now in the possession of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in the U.S.A. We observed the preparation of high-resolution facsimiles that will be restored at the original installation site.
     
    Created: May 2014

  • 05'09"

    Tsuzuri Project: Kenninji Temple Restoration - 50 painted Panels

    Long ago, Kenninji Temple in Kyoto was home to 50 panels painted by artist Kaiho Yusho. Since 1934, however, when Kenninji Temple suffered damage during the Muroto Typhoon, the panels, converted into hanging scrolls, have been entrusted to the Kyoto National Museum. The Tsuzuri Project produced high-resolution facsimiles of these works as sliding doors so they could be installed in the temple, their original home, and viewed as they once had been displayed. After five years of work, the restoration of the 50 Kenninji Temple panels was completed in November 2012.
     
    Created: February 2013

  • Tsuzuri Project: Highlights

    In 2007, Canon and the Kyoto Culture Association (NPO) jointly launched the Tsuzuri Project with the aim of preserving and sharing important Japanese cultural assets such as decorative folding screens and sliding door paintings through the creation of high-resolution facsimiles. This video highlights the various works that have been reproduced to date and presents the production process used to make the facsimiles.
     
    Created: May 2014

  • The Tsuzuri Project:
    The Passion of the Festival Transcends Time: “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” Makes a Symbolic Return Home

    A documentary movie of the Tsuzuri Project work “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine,” the original of which is in the collection of the British Museum. The large screens that survive today were painted 350 years ago, and depict scenes from the Owari Tsushima Tenno Festival. With the help of the British Museum, Canon began efforts to bring the work back to Tsushima City and Aisai City (Aichi Prefecture), where the festival is held, as a high-resolution facsimile.
     
    Created: July 2018

  • The Tsuzuri Project:
    Once Again, to Tonomine: “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” Makes a Symbolic Return Home

    A documentary movie of the Tsuzuri Project work “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter,” the original of which is in the collection of the British Museum. Believed to date back to the beginning of the 17th century, it comprises four sliding-door panels painted in a composition and style typical of the Kano school. With the help of the British Museum, Canon began efforts to bring the work back to its original home in Tanzan Shrine (Nara Prefecture) as a high-resolution facsimile.
     
    Created: July 2018

  • The Tsuzuri Project:
    Restoring the Beauty of a Dynasty Past: Folding screen by Tosa Mitsuyoshi depicting a scene from the historical novel, The Tale of Genji

    Canon used its most advanced input and output technologies to create a high-definition reproduction of the paintings on a folding screen that depict scenes from The Tale of Genji, the renowned historical novel. A reproduction of this screen — the original of which is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — has been donated to the Byodoin Temple in Uji, Japan.
     
    Created: March 2016

  • The Tsuzuri Project:From Beyond the Sea and Clouds "Dragon and Clouds by Soga Shohaku"

    A documentary movie of Tsuzuri Project Work "Dragon and Clouds." The original now resides overseas in the United States, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
     
    Created: April 2015

  • Tsuzuri Project: A Brush with History

    The goal of the Tsuzuri Project is not to complete high-definition reproductions. Its real purpose is to touch our hearts.We produced a video showing how the recipients of these reproductions use them in the temples of Kyoto, in new museum workshops, and for teaching at elementary schools.
     
    Created: June 2014

  • The Tsuzuri Project:
    Sliding Door Paintings of Shoshinden of Daikakuji Temple Recreated On-site after an Absence of 250 Years

    Sliding door paintings by Kano Sanraku are believed to have been installed in the Take-no-ma (bamboo room) of Shoshinden of Daikakuji Temple in Kyoto until 250 years ago. The paintings, which depict four seasonal views of rice cultivation, are now in the possession of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts in the U.S.A. We observed the preparation of high-resolution facsimiles that will be restored at the original installation site.
     
    Created: May 2014

  • Tsuzuri Project: Kenninji Temple Restoration - 50 painted Panels

    Long ago, Kenninji Temple in Kyoto was home to 50 panels painted by artist Kaiho Yusho. Since 1934, however, when Kenninji Temple suffered damage during the Muroto Typhoon, the panels, converted into hanging scrolls, have been entrusted to the Kyoto National Museum. The Tsuzuri Project produced high-resolution facsimiles of these works as sliding doors so they could be installed in the temple, their original home, and viewed as they once had been displayed. After five years of work, the restoration of the 50 Kenninji Temple panels was completed in November 2012.
     
    Created: February 2013