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October 26,2020

Five High Resolution Facsimiles, Including the National Treasure “Pine Trees”, Donated to the National Institutes for Cultural Heritage

On Monday, October 26, 2020 at the Tokyo National Museum, high resolution facsimiles of “Pine Trees”, “Cooling Off”, “Kabuki Theater”, “Autumn Grasses” and “Namban Ships and Chinese Junks” that were produced in Stage 13 of the Tsuzuri Project were donated to the National Institutes for Cultural Heritage.

The National Treasure “Pine Trees” (drawn by Hasegawa Tohaku) is a work that is considered a masterpiece among modern ink and wash paintings that expresses in an emotionally rich manner the everyday scenery of a pine forest in varying levels of visibility to illustrate haziness. A high resolution facsimile of the same work was produced and donated in Stage 1 of the Tsuzuri Project (in 2007), but thanks to innovation of the shooting system and improvement of printing technology, high-resolution data with total pixels of approximately 5,400 mega pixels was acquired in this stage, realizing the production of a high resolution facsimile that is truer to the original.

At the Family Gallery: TNM and Art Tunes! Present: “Becoming Japanese Art – Round Two!” that will be held at the Tokyo National Museum from October 27 to December 6, 2020, high resolution facsimiles of “Pine Trees” that was donated through the Tsuzuri Project and of “The Wind and Thunder Gods / Flowering Plants of Summer and Autumn” that were produced in a joint research project with the CPCP will be exhibited. This event provides a new art experience made possible by high resolution facsimiles, such as projection mapping of movies onto the high resolution facsimiles.

At the Kujokan located in the north garden of the Tokyo National Museum, “Cooling Off” (October 27 to November 8), “Autumn Grasses” (November 10 to 23) and “Kabuki Theater” (November 25 to December 6) will be exhibited. There will be no exhibitions on days where use of the Kujokan is planned.

News Release ” Tsuzuri Project to donate high-resolution facsimiles of works including "Pine Trees" by Hasegawa Tohaku, to the National Institutes for Cultural Heritage for display at the Tokyo National Museum”

 Catalog presentation of works donated in Stage 13
Catalog presentation of works donated in Stage 13
Exhibit using a high resolution facsimile of “Pine Trees”
Exhibit using a high resolution facsimile of “Pine Trees”
Exhibit using a high resolution facsimile of “The Wind and Thunder Gods / Flowering Plants of Summer and Autumn”
Exhibit using a high resolution facsimile of “The Wind and Thunder Gods / Flowering Plants of Summer and Autumn”
High resolution facsimile of “Autumn Grasses” exhibited at Kujokan
High resolution facsimile of “Autumn Grasses” exhibited at Kujokan

June 24, 2019

Tsuzuri Project to donate high-resolution facsimiles of 13 works by Katsushika Hokusai, in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution Freer Gallery of Art, to Tokyo's Sumida Ward

On June 24, 2019, the opening ceremony for “The Tsuzuri Project: The Art of Hokusai, reproduced from the collection of the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution”exhibition was held at the Sumida Hokusai Museum in Sumida Ward, Tokyo, And the project donated 13 high-resolution facsimiles of works by Katsushika Hokusai the originals of which reside in the collection of the Smithsonian Institution Freer Gallery of Art (Freer Gallery), as part of the project's Stage 12.

The Freer Gallery of Art, which is known as a treasure house of Japanese art, but gallery policy forbids any of the works in the collection from leaving the premises, As such, the only way to view these works thus far has been to visit the gallery in person.

Of the 12,700 pieces of Japanese art in the Freer Gallery's collection, the Tsuzuri Project has chosen to produce high-resolution facsimiles of these 13 works by Hokusai and donate them to Tokyo's Sumida Ward—where Hokusai spent much of his life—allowing these famed works of Japanese art to make a symbolic return home.

The donated works are on display from June 25 to August 25, 2019 in an exhibition entitled “The Tsuzuri Project: The Art of Hokusai, reproduced from the collection of the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution” was held at the Sumida Hokusai Museum.

The opening ceremony
The opening ceremony
Atendees admire a facsimile in a traditional setting
Atendees admire a facsimile in a traditional setting
The facsimiles of Six Tama Rivers
The facsimiles of Six Tama Rivers
The facsimiles of Birds, Animals, and Plants Representing the Twelve
The facsimiles of Birds, Animals, and Plants Representing the Twelve Months

October 29, 2018

Joint research project regarding the creation and use of high-resolution facsimiles of important cultural properties launched.
“Battles of Ichi-no-tani and Yashima, from the Tale of the Heike” Donated to The National Center for the Promotion of Cultural Properties (NCPCP)

On October 29, the National Center for the Promotion of Cultural Properties (NCPCP) , part of the National Institutes for Cultural Heritage (NICH), and Canon Inc. (Canon) announced that the two organizations will collaborate on the creation of high-resolution facsimiles of important Japanese works of art using technology employed by the Tsuzuri Project (officially, the Cultural Inheritance Project) jointly administered by Canon and the non-profit Kyoto Culture Association, and will cooperate on research and testing to develop new applications for such technology.

To commemorate the project's launch, a high-resolution facsimile of "Battles of Ichi-no-Tani and Yashima, from Tales of the Heike" part of the Tsuzuri Project's Stage 11, was donated to the NICH. Created during the early Edo period (17th to 19th centuries), the work comprises two folding screens, each of which depict one of two battles that led to the demise of the Taira Clan, also known as the "Heike." The original work is currently owned by the British Museum, so this dedication represents a “homecoming” of a Japanese painting masterpiece.

The donated facsimile was displayed at the Tokyo National Museum from October 23 to December 2, 2018.

News Release “National Center for the Promotion of Cultural Properties and Canon Inc. commence joint research project regarding the creation and use of high-resolution facsimiles of cultural properties

Representatives pose for a commemorative photo
Representatives pose for a commemorative photo
Members of the press examine the newest facsimile
Members of the press examine the newest facsimile

July 3, 2018

“River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” Donated to Tsushima City and Aisai City in Aichi Prefecture

On Tuesday, July 3, 2018, a high resolution facsimile of “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” that was produced as part of Stage 11 of the Tsuzuri Project was donated to Tsushima City and Aisai City at the Tsushima City Tourism Exchange Center in Aichi Prefecture.

“River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” is a work from the Edo period, and depicts scenes of the Owari Tsushima Tenno Festival, which has been continuing for almost 600 years as a festival of Tsushima Shrine. The original work is currently owned by the British Museum. The donation of its facsimile to Tsushima City and Aisai City, where this festival is held, represents a “homecoming” of a Japanese painting masterpiece.

The facsimile of “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine” was exhibited at select locations in Tsushima City and Aisai City until July 29, 2018, the day of the Owari Tsushima Tenno Festival.

The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The facsimile of “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine”
The facsimile of “River Festival at Tsushima Shrine”

June 28, 2018

“Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” Dedicated to Tanzan Shrine in Nara Prefecture
The dedication ceremony
The dedication ceremony

On Thursday, June 28, 2018, a high resolution facsimile of “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” that was produced as part of Stage 11 of the Tsuzuri Project was dedicated to Tanzan Shrine in Nara Prefecture.

“Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” is a work from the Edo period, and consists of sliding-door panels depicting scenes from autumn and winter, including wild geese, ducks, white camellia and Japanese Sarcandra. The original work is currently owned by the British Museum. It was originally located in Tanzan Shrine, which is known for being the site of talks during the Taika Reforms, so this dedication represents a “homecoming” of a Japanese painting masterpiece.

The facsimile of “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter” is planned to be permanently exhibited in Tanzan Shrine’s pagoda, which is an Important Cultural Property.

The facsimile of “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter”
The facsimile of “Birds and Flowers of Autumn and Winter”
Tanzan Shrine’s pagoda
Tanzan Shrine’s pagoda

June 30, 2017

“Landscape of the Four Seasons” and “Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” produced and donated to Kyoto National Museum

The high resolution facsimiles of the folding screens, “Landscape of the Four Seasons” and “Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” produced in the tenth stage of the Tsuzuri Project, were donated to Kyoto National Museum at a ceremony held at the museum on June 30 (Fri.), 2017.

Painted by Shikibu Terutada in the Muromachi era, “Landscape of the Four Seasons” is a pair of six-panel folding screens with a continuous design from right to left across the two sets, which symbolizes the four seasons through the images of plum trees, waterfall, autumn leaves, and snow-covered mountains. Including these screens, there are only a few known examples of such large pieces by Shikibu Terutada.

“Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” is said to have been created by Kano Soshu in the Momoyama era. This piece is a pair of six-panel folding screens that employ rich colors on gold leaf to depict Tatars, nomadic tribes living in the highlands of Mongolia, hunting and playing a ball game similar to modern day polo.

The originals of both pieces are currently in the possession of the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, US. By donating these high resolution facsimiles to the Kyoto National Museum, we have succeeded in bringing these masterpieces “back home” to Japan.

The high resolution facsimiles of “Landscape of the Four Seasons” and “Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” will be on special display in the Grand Lobby of the Heisei Chishinkan Wing of Kyoto National Museum until September 3 (excluding July 28 to August 2).

The screens displayed in the Grand Lobby of the Heisei Chishinkan Wing
The screens displayed in the Grand Lobby of the Heisei Chishinkan Wing
The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The Heisei Chishinkan Wing of Kyoto National Museum
The Heisei Chishinkan Wing of Kyoto National Museum

April 11, 2016

Reproductions of Kano Sanraku and Sansetsu's 22 paintings for the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin temple were donated to Tenkyuin temple
The Plum Room, where the donated reproduction of Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees is on display
The Plum Room, where the donated reproduction of Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees is on display

On April 11, 2016, as part of Stage 9 of the Tsuzuri Project, we produced high-resolution facsimiles of the 22 sliding door paintings located in the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin temple. These facsimiles were donated to Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple in Kyoto.

Over a five-year period beginning in 2012, the Tsuzuri Project was involved in the reproduction of kinpeki-ga (landscape paintings made with gold-foil-pressed paper) in the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin. The facsimile project came to a conclusion with the reproduction of a total of 56 paintings on sliding doors that decorate the Morning Glory Room, the Tiger Room, and the Plum Room of the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin. These included Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees, a work originally created by the artists Kano Sanraku and Sansetsu and donated as the final contribution of this project. Following the donation of the facsimiles, the original cultural assets were entrusted to the Kyoto National Museum for safekeeping in a controlled environment.

Tenkyuin is normally closed to the public, but it is scheduled to open on special occasions in spring and autumn when the facsimiles are displayed in place of the original artworks.

Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple
Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple

March 18, 2016

Reproductions of Tosa Mitsuyoshi's "Scenes from The Tale of Genji" were donated to Byodoin Temple
Scenes from The Tale of Genji installed at the Byodoin Museum Hoshokan
Scenes from The Tale of Genji installed at the Byodoin Museum Hoshokan

As part of Stage 9 of the Tsuzuri Project, Scenes from The Tale of Genji were reproduced and the facsimiles were donated to Byodoin Temple in Kyoto on March 18, 2016.

The Tale of Genji comprises 54 chapters; these screens depict scenes from the chapters titled Sekiya, Miyuki and Ukifune. It is believed that these screens were part of the original sliding doors that enclosed the room. The original art is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the U.S.A. In cooperation with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Tsuzuri Project produced high-resolution facsimiles of Scenes from The Tale of Genji. These reproductions were donated to Byodoin Temple, Uji, Kyoto as a symbolic homecoming to the setting of The Tale of Genji.

The high-resolution facsimiles of a pair of four-fold screens depicting Scenes from The Tale of Genji were installed at Byodoin Museum Hoshokan and displayed to the public in a special exhibition open until April 24.

Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Byodoin Temple, a World Heritage Site
Byodoin Temple, a World Heritage Site

April 23, 2015

Reproduction of Hasegawa Tohaku's "Dragon and Tiger" is donated to Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Press conference explaining the donation
Press conference explaining the donation

As part of the "Tsuzuri Project," we created high-definition facsimiles of the masterpiece "Dragon and Tiger" in cooperation with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and donated it to the new Oita Prefectural Art Museum, which opened on April 24.

On April 23, a press conference was held before the opening of the museum, where the facsimile screens of the "Tsuzuri Project" were introduced. These screens will be exhibited in the museum as well as used in the art appreciation education event to which all 60,000 elementary school students in Oita Prefecture are invited through "The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students" project.

The epic "Dragon and Tiger," painted by Hasegawa Tohaku in his later years, is currently owned by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the United States.

Presentation at the opening ceremony
Presentation at the opening ceremony
'Dragon and Tiger' opened to the public after the ceremony
"Dragon and Tiger" opened to the public after the ceremony
The new Oita Prefectural Art Museum
The new Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Photograph from 'The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students'
Photograph from "The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students"

March 13, 2015

Reproduction of Soga Shohaku's "Dragon and Clouds" donated to Tenryuji Temple
'Dragon and Clouds' on display in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber
"Dragon and Clouds" on display in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber

As part of Stage 8 of the Tsuzuri Project, high-resolution facsimiles of the "Dragon and Clouds" panels were donated to Kyoto's Tenryuji Temple on March 13, 2015.

"Dragon and Clouds," a series of panels by Soga Shohaku, a painter of the Edo period, is a work believed to have been designed for use as sliding doors. This work is now in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, U.S.A., which generously consented to the creation of high-resolution facsimiles of this work as part of Stage 8 of the Tsuzuri Project. The reproduction was donated to Tenryuji Temple, which is itself named after a dragon. The work can once again be seen in Kyoto, the birthplace of Soga Shohaku.

The high-resolution facsimiles of all eight panels of "Dragon and Clouds" will be displayed in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber facing Sogen Pond Garden, a beautiful setting designated by the Japanese Government as a Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance. This reproduction is scheduled to be displayed to the public for about 90 days every year as part of a special exhibition.

Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Large abbot's chamber beyond Sogen Pond Garden, a Japanese Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance
Large abbot's chamber beyond Sogen Pond Garden, a Japanese Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance