Canon

Activities

June 30, 2017

“Landscape of the Four Seasons” and “Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” produced and donated to Kyoto National Museum

The high resolution facsimiles of the folding screens, “Landscape of the Four Seasons” and “Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” produced in the tenth stage of the Tsuzuri Project, were donated to Kyoto National Museum at a ceremony held at the museum on June 30 (Fri.), 2017.

Painted by Shikibu Terutada in the Muromachi era, “Landscape of the Four Seasons” is a pair of six-panel folding screens with a continuous design from right to left across the two sets, which symbolizes the four seasons through the images of plum trees, waterfall, autumn leaves, and snow-covered mountains. Including these screens, there are only a few known examples of such large pieces by Shikibu Terutada.

“Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” is said to have been created by Kano Soshu in the Momoyama era. This piece is a pair of six-panel folding screens that employ rich colors on gold leaf to depict Tatars, nomadic tribes living in the highlands of Mongolia, hunting and playing a ball game similar to modern day polo.

The originals of both pieces are currently in the possession of the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, US. By donating these high resolution facsimiles to the Kyoto National Museum, we have succeeded in bringing these masterpieces “back home” to Japan.

The high resolution facsimiles of “Landscape of the Four Seasons” and “Tatars Playing Polo and Hunting” will be on special display in the Grand Lobby of the Heisei Chishinkan Wing of Kyoto National Museum until September 3 (excluding July 28 to August 2).

The screens displayed in the Grand Lobby of the Heisei Chishinkan Wing
The screens displayed in the Grand Lobby of the Heisei Chishinkan Wing
The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The donation ceremony
The Heisei Chishinkan Wing of Kyoto National Museum
The Heisei Chishinkan Wing of Kyoto National Museum

April 11, 2016

Reproductions of Kano Sanraku and Sansetsu's 22 paintings for the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin temple were donated to Tenkyuin temple
The Plum Room, where the donated reproduction of Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees is on display
The Plum Room, where the donated reproduction of Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees is on display

On April 11, 2016, as part of Stage 9 of the Tsuzuri Project, we produced high-resolution facsimiles of the 22 sliding door paintings located in the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin temple. These facsimiles were donated to Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple in Kyoto.

Over a five-year period beginning in 2012, the Tsuzuri Project was involved in the reproduction of kinpeki-ga (landscape paintings made with gold-foil-pressed paper) in the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin. The facsimile project came to a conclusion with the reproduction of a total of 56 paintings on sliding doors that decorate the Morning Glory Room, the Tiger Room, and the Plum Room of the Abbot's Chambers of Tenkyuin. These included Frolicking Birds in Plum and Willow Trees, a work originally created by the artists Kano Sanraku and Sansetsu and donated as the final contribution of this project. Following the donation of the facsimiles, the original cultural assets were entrusted to the Kyoto National Museum for safekeeping in a controlled environment.

Tenkyuin is normally closed to the public, but it is scheduled to open on special occasions in spring and autumn when the facsimiles are displayed in place of the original artworks.

Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple
Tenkyuin temple, a subtemple of Myoshinji Temple

March 18, 2016

Reproductions of Tosa Mitsuyoshi's "Scenes from The Tale of Genji" were donated to Byodoin Temple
Reproductions of Tosa Mitsuyoshi's 'Scenes from The Tale of Genji' were donated to Byodoin Temple
Scenes from The Tale of Genji installed at the Byodoin Museum Hoshokan

As part of Stage 9 of the Tsuzuri Project, Scenes from The Tale of Genji were reproduced and the facsimiles were donated to Byodoin Temple in Kyoto on March 18, 2016.

The Tale of Genji comprises 54 chapters; these screens depict scenes from the chapters titled Sekiya, Miyuki and Ukifune. It is believed that these screens were part of the original sliding doors that enclosed the room. The original art is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the U.S.A. In cooperation with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Tsuzuri Project produced high-resolution facsimiles of Scenes from The Tale of Genji. These reproductions were donated to Byodoin Temple, Uji, Kyoto as a symbolic homecoming to the setting of The Tale of Genji.

The high-resolution facsimiles of a pair of four-fold screens depicting Scenes from The Tale of Genji were installed at Byodoin Museum Hoshokan and displayed to the public in a special exhibition open until April 24.

Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Byodoin Temple, a World Heritage Site
Byodoin Temple, a World Heritage Site

April 23, 2015

Reproduction of Hasegawa Tohaku's "Dragon and Tiger" is donated to Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Press conference explaining the donation
Press conference explaining the donation

As part of the "Tsuzuri Project," we created high-definition facsimiles of the masterpiece "Dragon and Tiger" in cooperation with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and donated it to the new Oita Prefectural Art Museum, which opened on April 24.

On April 23, a press conference was held before the opening of the museum, where the facsimile screens of the "Tsuzuri Project" were introduced. These screens will be exhibited in the museum as well as used in the art appreciation education event to which all 60,000 elementary school students in Oita Prefecture are invited through "The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students" project.

The epic "Dragon and Tiger," painted by Hasegawa Tohaku in his later years, is currently owned by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in the United States.

Presentation at the opening ceremony
Presentation at the opening ceremony
'Dragon and Tiger' opened to the public after the ceremony
"Dragon and Tiger" opened to the public after the ceremony
The new Oita Prefectural Art Museum
The new Oita Prefectural Art Museum
Photograph from 'The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students'
Photograph from "The First Museum Experience for Elementary School Students"

March 13, 2015

Reproduction of Soga Shohaku's "Dragon and Clouds" donated to Tenryuji Temple
'Dragon and Clouds' on display in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber
"Dragon and Clouds" on display in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber

As part of Stage 8 of the Tsuzuri Project, high-resolution facsimiles of the "Dragon and Clouds" panels were donated to Kyoto's Tenryuji Temple on March 13, 2015.

"Dragon and Clouds," a series of panels by Soga Shohaku, a painter of the Edo period, is a work believed to have been designed for use as sliding doors. This work is now in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, U.S.A., which generously consented to the creation of high-resolution facsimiles of this work as part of Stage 8 of the Tsuzuri Project. The reproduction was donated to Tenryuji Temple, which is itself named after a dragon. The work can once again be seen in Kyoto, the birthplace of Soga Shohaku.

The high-resolution facsimiles of all eight panels of "Dragon and Clouds" will be displayed in the Dragon Room in the large abbot's chamber facing Sogen Pond Garden, a beautiful setting designated by the Japanese Government as a Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance. This reproduction is scheduled to be displayed to the public for about 90 days every year as part of a special exhibition.

Presentation ceremony
Presentation ceremony
Large abbot's chamber beyond Sogen Pond Garden, a Japanese Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance
Large abbot's chamber beyond Sogen Pond Garden, a Japanese Site of Special Historic and Scenic Importance

September 3, 2017

Tokyo National Museum holds Diving into Screen Paintings — an interactive family-oriented program

The Tokyo National Museum held the interactive family-oriented program, Diving into Screen Paintings: A New Way to Experience Japanese Art, between July 4 and September 3, 2017 in Honkan Rooms T4 and T5.

The exhibition was designed to give visitors a new way to experience and enjoy Japanese art made possible by high-resolution reproductions.

Room T5 showcased a high-resolution facsimile of Pine Trees, held by the Tokyo National Museum. On entering the dim venue, visitors passed under curtains with projections of pine trees, drawing them into the world of Hasegawa Tohaku’s Pine Trees folding screens. The installation even included a breeze carrying the scent of pines to heighten the experience.

A 4K projector displayed exceedingly lifelike 4K images, intended to evoke the atmosphere of the folding screens, on a semicircular screen five meters in height and 15 meters in diameter. By sitting on tatami mats in front of the Pine Trees reproduction with no exhibition cases to interfere with the experience, visitors were able to view the folding screens as they were meant to be seen. Such an experience would not be possible with the original national treasures.

Room T4 featured a high-resolution facsimile of Cranes, held by the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. (The Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum holds the reproduction.) Visiting kids shouted in delight at the interactive installation, in which projected cranes flapped their wings when visitors approach them. The cranes, projected on large screens, moved in response to visitors’ movements, after which they appeared to return back inside the folding screens.

Around 82,000 people visited the exhibition during its run, including many overseas visitors.

Watch the videos below to get a sense of the wonderful installations.

Entrance
Entrance
The installation in Room T5 of the Honkan
The installation in Room T5 of the Honkan
The installation in Room T4 of the Honkan
The installation in Room T4 of the Honkan
Diving into Screen Paintings(02'13")
Diving into Screen Paintings(02'13")
Diving into Screen Paintings(02'13")

October 22, 2016

Workshop held at the Kujokan Teahouse of Tokyo National Museum.

On October 22 (Sat.), 2016, the facsimile of the “Pine Trees” folding screen (from the collection of Tokyo National Museum) was used for a family-oriented workshop held at the Kujokan Teahouse in the garden of Tokyo National Museum.

The workshop consisted of a morning and an afternoon session, attended by nine groups and seven groups respectively, with a total of 40 participants.
The workshop gave participants the opportunity to experience how the screens were originally used, as they were invited to think about how the screens can be arranged, and the specialist staff with expert knowledge in the field of art recreated their ideas.
Participants were also able to enjoy viewing the screens in a number of different ways, including in darkness, natural light, and lighting resembling candlelight.

Staff explain the folding screens
Staff explain the folding screens
並べ方を考える
Participants think about how to arrange the screens
Participants try out their arrangement of the screens
Participants try out their arrangement of the screens
Participants view the screens in light resembling candlelight
Participants view the screens in light resembling candlelight

October 13, 2016

Mitsui Memorial Museum holds a class at a Tokyo junior high school

On October 13 (Thu.), 2016, staff from Mitsui Memorial Museum visited Minami Rokugo Junior High School in Ota ward, Tokyo, to hold a class using the facsimile of “Pine Trees in the Snow” (from the collection of Mitsui Memorial Museum) created by the Tsuzuri Project.

The class was attended by six classes of second year students—234 students in total. While folding screens are normally first seen in the light, staff place importance on students’ first glimpse of the work, by using the unique method of setting the screen up closed, darkening the room, and then unfolding the screen before students’ eyes.

This class is held as part of educational initiatives related to the Olympic and Paralympics, and students also considered ways of introducing the appeal of folding screens to people from overseas.

Ms. Kamei from Mitsui Memorial Museum
Ms. Kamei from Mitsui Memorial Museum
Students view the folding screens
Students view the folding screens
Students describe their impressions of the folding screens
Students describe their impressions of the folding screens
Ms. Sato conducts the Olympic and Paralympic educational activities
Ms. Sato conducts the Olympic and Paralympic educational activities

March 26, 2016

Workshop held at the Kujokan Teahouse of Tokyo National Museum.

On March 26 (Sat.), 2016, the facsimile of the “Pine Trees” folding screen (from the collection of Tokyo National Museum) was used for a family-oriented workshop held at the Okyokan Teahouse in the garden of Tokyo National Museum.

The workshop consisted of a morning and an afternoon session, attended by nine groups and nine groups respectively, with a total of 48 participants.
The workshop gave participants the opportunity to experience how the screens were originally used, as they were invited to think about how the screens can be arranged, and the specialist staff with expert knowledge in the field of art recreated their ideas. Participants were also able to enjoy viewing the screens in a number of different ways, including in darkness, natural light, and lighting resembling candlelight.

Staff explain the folding screens
Staff explain the folding screens
Participants think about how to arrange the screens
Participants think about how to arrange the screens
Participants try out their arrangement of the screens
Participants try out their arrangement of the screens
Participants view the screens in light resembling candlelight
Participants view the screens in light resembling candlelight