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Viewing Cherry Blossoms at Ueno Park and Autumn at Asakusa

Hishikawa Moronobu

  • Viewing Cherry Blossoms at Ueno Park and Autumn at Asakusa / Hishikawa Moronobu
  • Viewing Cherry Blossoms at Ueno Park and Autumn at Asakusa / Hishikawa Moronobu

Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC: Gift of Charles Lang Freer, F1906.266 F1906.267

These images are based on the high resolution facsimile produced by the Tsuzuri Project. Unauthorized copying, duplication, or transfer of these images is strictly prohibited.

DATA
Artist:
Hishikawa Moronobu
Historical era:
Edo (17th century)
Material:
Printed on washi, with gold leafs and dust applied
Medium:
Pair of six-fold screens
Theme:
High Resolution Facsimile of Japanese Art Abroad
Size:
Each screen 179.9 x 382.3 cm (L x W)
Recipient:
Natural History Museum and Institute, ChibaMAP
[Original]
Current owner:
Freer Gallery of Art
Material:
Colored paper with gold dust applied
DESCRIPTION

This work was done by Hishikawa Moronobu who is known for establishing the block print as an art form that is to be appreciated as a single picture, and as the founder of Ukiyoe prints. The right screen depicts an autumn scene, bustling with prayer goers to the Sensoji Temple, scenes of Asakusa, and folks enjoying a boat ride along the Sumida River. The left screen depicts spring with merry makers observing cherry blossoms, and famous sites around Ueno Kaneiji and Shinobazu pond. The two screens illustrate how commoners enjoyed the seasons in the Edo era, while the brilliant colored garments and hair styles depict what life was like at that time. Moronobu drew the lifestyle of commoners during the Edo era in great detail, and created many artifacts including books and paintings by both woodblock and hand. His best known works are Mikaeri Bijin ("A Beauty Looking Back"), and Kabukizu Byobu ("Kabuki Drama").

About the Works